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04.02.2020

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A winter version of the Greek classic, Briam. Delicious root veggies such as sweet potato, turnips, carrots, beetroot, celery root, onions and radishes meet cauliflower, lemon, olive oil and warming spices, and all together they roast away slowly in the oven until soft and slightly caramelized. Easy to prepare and so good to enjoy.

Cumin Roasted Root Vegetable Medley. My Winter “Briam”. www.thefoodiecorner.gr Photo description: Winter vegetables arranged in a row on a worn wooden surface. Radishes, carrots, sweet potato, celery root, cauliflower, beetroot, turnips and onions.

I’ve talked about Briam before, and I’ve shared a tasty slow cooker version too. Classic Briam is a very summery dish, and the traditional recipe uses courgettes (zucchini), aubergine (eggplant), tomatoes, potatoes, onions and lots of olive oil (with a few variations on these ingredients depending on who is making it of course). You could make the summer version all year round but why not try something different and more seasonal in winter?

Cumin Roasted Root Vegetable Medley. My Winter “Briam”. www.thefoodiecorner.gr Photo description: Raw, chopped root vegetables and cauliflower spread out on a baking dish ready to be roasted.

Cumin Roasted Root Vegetable Medley. My Winter “Briam”. www.thefoodiecorner.gr Photo description: Roasted root vegetables and cauliflower spread out on a baking dish ready to be served.

This is a similar style dish, i.e. vegetables roasted in olive oil, only I’ve swapped the summer veggies for their gorgeous winter cousins. A large variety of root vegetables which I adore, plus some good old cauliflower which is so delicious when roasted. You know the saying, “eat the rainbow”? You’re off to a good start with this recipe that’s for sure.

Cumin Roasted Root Vegetable Medley. My Winter “Briam”. www.thefoodiecorner.gr Photo description: A ceramic dish full of roasted root vegetables. To the top left of the dish are some empty plates and forks, half visible. To the left of the dish is a linen napkin and some serving spoons.

“Eating the rainbow” is something I am really trying to get into the habit of myself. I must confess I sometimes forget and end up with more beige on my plate than I’d like, so I am especially happy to have found a great resource for inspiration, ideas and recipes. Are you familiar with the website Love My Salad? If you sometimes struggle to find ideas for new veggie-loaded dishes, this is a great site to turn to. There is something for everyone here, with many different ingredients and many different cuisines to explore. I am really happy to be contributing to this fantastic initiative, and helping in my small way those who are struggling to incorporate more vegetables in their diet.

Cumin Roasted Root Vegetable Medley. My Winter “Briam”. www.thefoodiecorner.gr Photo description: A side view of a ceramic dish full of roasted root vegetables against a dark background. Behind the dish are some smaller plates of food and a ceramic bottle.

Go take a look and get some inspiration for tomorrow’s dinner. I say tomorrow’s because tonight you’re making this winter briam, right?

Cumin Roasted Root Vegetable Medley. My Winter “Briam”. www.thefoodiecorner.gr Photo description: A closer view of the roasted root vegetables (winter briam) on a ceramic dish. To the top right, half visible, is a small plate with hummus and roasted veg.

Sweet potatoes, turnips, carrots, beetroot, celery root (celeriac), onions and radishes combined with cauliflower, all bathed in a mixture of tangy lemon juice, rich olive oil and warming spices like cumin and paprika, and slow roasted until tender and slightly caramelized. It’s a doddle to prepare, despite having several ingredients. And you can always adapt it and use veggies you have on hand. I suggest serving this delicious vegetable medley with some hummus for an even more wholesome and filling meal. But a loaf of good crusty bread or some barley rusks and feta would also be ideal accompaniments.

Cumin Roasted Root Vegetable Medley. My Winter “Briam”. www.thefoodiecorner.gr Photo description: A close view of a small ceramic plate with a portion of hummus and roasted vegetables. To the left of the food, lying on the plate, is a fork with some hummus on it.

Ingredients

400 g sweet potato (approx 1 medium)
250 g turnips (approx 2 small/medium)
150 g carrots (approx 2 small/medium)
270 g beetroot (approx 2 small/medium)
250 g celery root (aka celeriac, approx 1 small root)
150 g onions (approx 2 medium)
400 g cauliflower (approx ½ a small head)
120 g radishes (approx 10 small)
120 ml (1/2 cup) olive oil
120 ml (1/2 cup) water
3 Tbs lemon juice, freshly squeezed
1 Tbs dried thyme
1 Tbs powdered cumin
2 tsp sweet paprika
1 ½ tsp salt
1 tsp lemon pepper
hummus, to serve
chopped celery or parsley leaves to garnish
*weight of vegetables is after preparation/peeling

Step 1

Preheat the oven to 180C fan assisted (200C conventional).

Step 2

Wash and gently scrub the sweet potato, turnips, carrots and beetroot – you don’t need to peel them! (see note) Peel the celery root and onions and cut everything into medium sized pieces. Wash the cauliflower and cut it into large florets (you want them a little larger than the rest of the vegetables). Don’t throw away the stem, you can include that as it’s also very tasty. Wash the radishes and combine all the vegetables in a large bowl.

Step 3

Combine the olive oil, water, lemon juice, thyme, cumin, sweet paprika, salt and lemon pepper in a clean jam jar with a lid. Shake well, pour the dressing over the vegetables (in batches if necessary) and toss with your fingers to coat them.

Step 4

Spread the veg out on a large baking sheet, add any dressing left in the bowl, and roast for about 40-45 minutes in the preheated oven until the beetroot is easily pierced with a knife.

Step 5

Serve warm over hummus and top with some chopped celery leaves or parsley if desired.

Notes: The skins of these vegetables are perfectly fine to eat; avoid food waste by keeping them on!

This post is sponsored by Love My Salad. All opinions are my own.

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